Birdman's Die Shot Collection
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Birdman.



Joined: 13 Nov 2012
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Location: Finland

PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2013 4:56 pm    Post subject: Some IBM CPU and console chip dies Reply with quote

Here are some die shots of CPUs and GPUs hidden inside gaming consoles:

Sony PlayStation 2:
- Emotion Engine CPU designed by Sony (180 nm): http://www.gamevortex.com/teamps2/psx2.html
- Graphics Synthesizer GPU designed by Sony (250 nm): http://www.gamevortex.com/teamps2/psx2.html

Sony PlayStation 3:
- Cell 'Cell Broadband Engine' CPU designed by STI (Sony, Toshiba, and IBM) (90 nm): http://www.schrankmonster.de/content/binary/CeLL_die_large.jpg (sharper version) and http://pages.cs.wisc.edu/~cain/images/diephotos/STI_Cell.jpg (more colorful version of the same photo)
- RSX 'Reality Synthesizer' GPU designed by NVIDIA and Sony (90 nm): http://marcansoft.com/transf/rsx.jpg

Nintendo Wii:
- Broadway CPU designed by IBM (90 nm): http://marcansoft.com/transf/broadway_die.jpg
- Hollywood GPU (Napa die) designed by ATI (90 nm): http://marcansoft.com/transf/hollywood_die.jpg
Hctor Martn (@marcan42) photographed and tweeted these beautiful Broadway, Hollywood and RSX dies, so Thank You a lot!

Nintendo Wii U:
- Espresso CPU designed by IBM (45 nm): http://media.beta.photobucket.com/user/awesomemattawesome/media/Wii_U_C10234F5_L8A_135880_Poly_branded.jpg.html
- Latte GPU designed by Nintendo and AMD (40nm): http://www.chipworks.com/blog/technologyblog/files/2013/02/C10234F5_Poly_b.jpg
Chipworks gave away these two polysilicon die photos, so Thank You a lot!
There is an interesting CPU and GPU analysis going on at NeoGAF forum, and to help them here is RV770 (Ati Radeon HD 4870/4850) GPU die (55 nm): http://www.pcgameshardware.com/&menu=browser&image_id=850064&article_id=654394&page=1&show=original

Microsoft XBox 360: Unfortunately, I haven't found good die shots yet.




Then some IBM CPU die shots:

POWER series:
- POWER4 (180 nm): http://pages.cs.wisc.edu/~cain/images/diephotos/IBM_Power4.jpg
- POWER4+ (130 nm): http://pages.cs.wisc.edu/~cain/images/diephotos/IBM_Power4Plus.jpg
- POWER5 (130 nm): http://pages.cs.wisc.edu/~cain/images/diephotos/IBM_Power5.jpg and http://www-03.ibm.com/press/us/en/attachment/10052.wss?fileId=ATTACH_FILE2&fileName=power5chipdie67fcf00.jpg
- POWER6 (65 nm): http://www-03.ibm.com/press/us/en/attachment/21562.wss?fileId=ATTACH_FILE2&fileName=p6die1.jpg
- POWER7 (45 nm): http://www.flickr.com/photos/ibm_media/4337657207/sizes/o/in/set-72157623247679285/
- POWER7+ (32 nm): http://www.flickr.com/photos/ibm_media/8033503923/sizes/o/in/photostream/
- POWER8 (22 nm): http://www.chipdesignmag.com/bursky/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/figure1-ibm-POWER8_die-high-res.jpg

PowerPC series:
- PowerPC 601 (G1, 600 nm): http://www.technologyreview.com/sites/default/files/legacy/0109-chip-j_x600.jpg
- PowerPC 602 (G2, 500 nm): http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/chipshots/ibm/ppc602large.html
- PowerPC 603e (G2, 500 nm): http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/chipshots/ibm/ppc603large.html
- PowerPC 750 (G3, 200 nm): http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/ibm100/images/icp/T693892N06627H47/us__en_us__ibm100__copper_interconnects__copper_chip_technology__900x660.jpg
- PowerPC 970 (G5, 130 nm): http://pages.cs.wisc.edu/~cain/images/diephotos/IBM_970.jpg
- PowerPC 970MP (G5 dual-core, 90 nm): http://infomars.fr/die/Power%20PC%20970%20DC%20%28G5%20DC%29.jpg
- PowerPC 405LP SoC (180 nm): http://www.ece.utep.edu/courses/web5375/Links_files/earl1_die_mpf.jpg and http://parallel.ru/sites/default/files/images/news/powerpc_detail.jpg
- BlueGene/L SoC with two PowerPC 440 cores and FPUs (130 nm): http://pages.cs.wisc.edu/~cain/images/diephotos/IBM_BlueGeneL.jpg and http://www.flickr.com/photos/ibm_media/2863006754/sizes/o/in/set-72157603320138054/

Other IBM CPUs:
- S/390 G6: http://pages.cs.wisc.edu/~cain/images/diephotos/IBM_390-G6.jpg
- z10 (65 nm): http://www.flickr.com/photos/ibm_media/2291626868/sizes/o/in/set-72157603320138054/
- zEC12 (32 nm): http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/redbooks/pdfs/sg248049.pdf Just copy the die shot at page 65 in file (page 41 in book) and save as picture.

I hope these die shots help those who try to analyze Nintendo Wii and Wii U CPU and GPU at NeoGAF and other sites.


Last edited by Birdman. on Wed Feb 19, 2014 1:29 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Birdman.



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PostPosted: Tue Mar 12, 2013 3:39 am    Post subject: Some NVIDIA GPU dies Reply with quote

Tom's Hardware has a great collection of NVIDIA GPU die shots at http://www.tomshardware.com/picturestory/524-nvidia-gpu-graphics.html. Just browse the images and click the zoom button appearing on the image to download the image. There you'll find the best die shots I've found of these GPUs:
- NV4 (Riva TNT, 350 nm)
- NV5 (Riva TNT2, 250 nm)
- NV10 (GeForce 256, 220 nm)
- NV11 (GeForce 2 MX, 180 nm)
- NV15 (GeForce 2 GTS, 180 nm)
- NV17 (GeForce 4 MX, 150 nm)
- NV20 (GeForce 3, 150 nm)
- NV25 (GeForce 4 Ti, 150 nm)
- NV40 (GeForce 6800 Ultra, 130 nm)
- GT200 (GeForce GTX 280, 65 nm) with 240 CUDA cores and 512-bit GDDR3 memory controller

Then some other NVIDIA GPU die shots:
- MCP79MX northbridge (65 nm) with integrated GeForce 9400M GPU (16 CUDA cores) and 128-bit DDR2/DDR3 memory controller: http://photos.pcpro.co.uk/blogs/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/geforce_9400m_die_shot.jpg
- G92b (GeForce 9800 GTX+ and GeForce GTX 280M, 55 nm) with 128 CUDA cores and 256-bit GDDR3 memory controller: http://www.hwmag.de/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/DieShot_GF_GTX_200M.jpg
- GT200 (GeForce GTX 280, 65 nm) with 240 CUDA cores and 512-bit GDDR3 memory controller: http://www.infobidouille.com/vx/actus/2009/04/01/intel-gpu-die.jpg and http://extrahardware.cnews.cz/sites/default/files/pictures/archive/clanky/2008/06cerven/gt200/ilus/gt200_die1.jpg in addition to the photo at Tom's Hardware
- GF100 (GeForce GTX 480, 40 nm) with 512 CUDA cores (480 enabled) and 384-bit GDDR5 memory controller: http://media.marketwire.com/attachments/EZIR/737/617888_Tesla_Fermi.jpg
- GK104 (GeForce GTX 680, 28 nm) with 1536 CUDA cores and 256-bit GDDR5 memory controller: http://images.anandtech.com/doci/5699/GeForce_GTX_680_Die_Shot.png
- GK110 (GeForce GTX Titan, 28 nm) with 2880 CUDA cores (2688 enabled) and 384-bit GDDR5 memory controller: http://www.pcper.com/files/review/2012-05-14/dieshot.jpg

Unfortunately, I haven't found any other good ATI/AMD GPU die shots except the RV770 in my previous post.


P.S. Unfortunately, pressroom-se.intel.com site disappeared taking down three Intel CPU dies shots there. I have now reuploaded them for you because I couldn't find original versions of them anywhere else.
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Vlasta



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PostPosted: Fri Mar 15, 2013 11:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Any idea what these are?

http://www.cpu-world.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=19705&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=15

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Neon_WA



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PostPosted: Fri Apr 05, 2013 10:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

some interesting high magnification work done here

http://www.optics.rochester.edu/workgroups/cml/opt307/spr06/alex/

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 05, 2013 11:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

nice!!
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Birdman.



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PostPosted: Tue Apr 30, 2013 6:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Neon_WA, Thanks for the link! I remember that I visited the site before, but the link is really useful for others. Please continue posting interesting links because they are always useful for others and one day I'll also find something new.

Vlasta, the thread you're linking to doesn't exist, unfortunately. Thus, I hope that the link is fixed or post removed.



I'll also post some links to die shots of older CPUs. These together with the ones I posted earlier are not all but many of the best ones I've found of older CPUs in my collection. I hope these are interesting for CPU collectors and include some really rare chips.

Some ARM CPUs:
- Acorn ARM1 (3.0 m): http://www.flickr.com/photos/duboulaybiggs/5470486537/sizes/o/in/photostream/
- Acorn ARM3 (1.5 m): http://www.altparty.org/2009/tl_files/special_guests/sophie/arm3_board.jpg
- ARM810 (0.5 m): http://www.hotchips.org/wp-content/uploads/hc_archives/hc08/2_Mon/HC8.S4/HC8.4.1.pdf (Copy the die shot at page 19 and adjust lighting to get nice contrast.)
Unfortunately, I haven't found any good die shots of ARM610, ARM710 and StrongARM CPUs used in the RiscPC, so I really hope someone could help to get them.

Berkeley RISC prototypes:
- RISC-I (5.0 m): http://www.cs.berkeley.edu/~pattrsn/Arch/RISC1.jpg
- RISC-II (3.0 m): http://www.cs.berkeley.edu/~pattrsn/Arch/RISC2.jpg
- T0 (MIPS-II 32-bit integer RISC core and dual eight-way parallel
vector arithmetic pipelines, 1.0 m): http://www.cs.berkeley.edu/~pattrsn/Arch/t0.jpg
These are available at http://www.cs.berkeley.edu/~pattrsn/Arch/prototypes2.html.

Some Inmos transputers:
- T414 (first released 32-bit transputer): http://www.chilton-computing.org.uk/gallery/ral86/orig/r87r2450.jpg (at http://www.chilton-computing.org.uk/inf/transputers/overview.htm)
- T800 (32-bit transputer with floating-point unit, 1.5 m): http://www.transputer.net/gallery/tdie/diefull.png (at http://www.transputer.net/gallery/gallery.asp with die sections explained and other information)
- T9000 (next generation transputer that wasn't released): http://www.inmos.com/images/t9000/T9000.jpg (at http://www.inmos.com/images/ together with some other lower resolution die shots)

Some Zilog CPUs:
- Z80: http://tiggerfox.tibsfox.com/zylog_z80_cpu.jpg
- Z80A (One of the clones, likely made by MME company in DDR, 5.0 m): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d1/Z80A-HD.jpg (one of the many die shots at http://zeptobars.ru/en/)
- Z80,000 (2.0 m): http://camelback-comparch.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/z80k.jpg (at http://camelback-comparch.com/about/technical-highlights/ with some information)

Two National Semiconductor CPUs in the previous source:
- National Semiconductor NS32532 (1.25 m): http://camelback-comparch.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/image029.jpg (at http://camelback-comparch.com/about/technical-highlights/ with some information)
- National Semiconductor NS32764 Swordfish (0.8 m): http://www.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/swordfish.tif (at http://people.cs.clemson.edu/~mark/swordfish.html with some information)

Two useful sites:
- http://www.science.widener.edu/~schultz/chips/chips.html has high-res die shots of Intel 80386DX IV (1.0 m), Intel 80486DX (P4, 1.0 m), Intel Pentium (P54C, 0.6 m), Weitek 3172A SPARC FPU, Texas Instruments ACT8847 SPARC FPU and Cypress CY7C601 SPARC IU (aka ROSS RT601) (0.8 m) taken by Marty Schultz. Thank You a lot for these great high-res die shots.
- http://blog.naver.com/sunpil4696/36413545 has many die shots, but they are all available elsewhere, usually with higher resolution. I think I've already linked to better versions of them here except the Intel 80386SL (1.0 m) for which I haven't found any better version, but the same version is also at http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-wVGRJY-VRLs/TsAk0cELlrI/AAAAAAAAAHY/V4PB_aMzs-k/s1600/114-intel_386.jpg.


Last edited by Birdman. on Wed Feb 19, 2014 1:41 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Vlasta



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PostPosted: Sat May 18, 2013 10:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You found this site yet?

http://infomars.fr/forum/index.php?showtopic=668

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Birdman.



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PostPosted: Sun May 19, 2013 6:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Vlasta wrote:
You found this site yet?

http://infomars.fr/forum/index.php?showtopic=668


Yes, I've found it when I started collecting die shots. I've already linked to some of those die shots here and to better versions of most of them. Anyway, that collection still has some great die shots that I haven't mentioned here earlier:
- Intel 1103 DRAM (1024 bits): http://www.infomars.fr/die/1103.jpg
- Intel Pentium III Xeon with 2 MB on-die L2 cache (Cascades 2M, 180 nm): http://www.infomars.fr/die/Pentium%203%20Xeon%202M%20-%20180nm.jpg
- AMD Athlon 64 with 512 kB on-die L2 cache (Newcastle, 130 nm): http://www.infomars.fr/die/Newcastle%20-%20Athlon%2064%20512K%20-%20130nm.jpg This is like Clawhammer with only half of the L2 cache.
- Sun UltraSPARC T2 with 8 cores (Niagara 2, 65 nm): http://infomars.fr/die/Niagara%20II%20%20%28Ultrasparc%20T2%29.jpg This is the highest resolution SPARC die shot I've found.
- Via Nano (Isaiah, 65 nm): http://infomars.fr/die/Via%20Isaiah.jpg I haven't found any other good VIA die shots.

I've also forgotten to link to better version of the Pentium II (Klamath, 350 nm) die there yet. A higher resolution version of it is available at some desktop picture sites like http://www.deskpicture.com/DPs/Technology/IntelP6Die.jpg and http://loadpaper.com/large/Intel_wallpapers_255.jpg (identical files). I haven't found any better Pentium II die shot yet. Although not specified, this one should be Klamath because it has connection pads for wire bonding and 250 nm Deschutes has FCBGA packaging.

You can also get the other high-res SPARC die I've found at http://www.cs.duke.edu/courses/cps220/fall06/lectures/UltraSparc_T1_Niagra.pdf. Just save the die shot at page 33 and you'll get a beautiful unannotated high-res Sun UltraSPARC T1 (Niagara, 90 nm) die shot. That one has eight cores with 90 nm process whereas 90 nm x86 CPUs only have one or two cores.
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 03, 2013 9:20 pm    Post subject: Die shots at Wikimedia Commons and Wikipedia Reply with quote

Wikimedia Commons and Wikipedia have some beautiful die shots, so I'll list them here so that you can find them and enjoy looking at them easier.

Pdesousa359 has taken some beautiful die shots that I really enjoy looking at in my collection:
- Motorola MC68060: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1a/MC68060RC50.jpg
- Intel 80960CF: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/87/Intel_A80960CF-25.jpg
Links to all die shots taken by Pdesousa359 and license information are at http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Special:Contributions/Pdesousa359. Thank You a lot!

Epop has taken more than 100 die shots of all kinds of chips, and you'll find them all at http://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=Special:Contributions/Epop&offset=&limit=500&target=Epop together with license information. There are many beautiful high-resolution and high-quality ones, for example these:
- AMD Am386 DX (40 MHz version, 800 nm): http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b6/ADVANCED_MICRO_DEVICES_Am386_TM_DX-40_NG80386DX-40_D_313NFY9_m_AMD_5983D_9312BP_MALAYSIA.jpg
- AMD K6-2 (250 nm): http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/50/AMD_1998_105B92A6085AW.jpg (Top metal layers visible instead of polysilicon layer in other modern CPU die shots.)
- Intel 80486 DX (33 MHz version manufactured by IBM): http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/43/486DX-33_63G9145_PQ_IBM9314_9346_1745_C_INTEL_1989_1_77G2845.jpg
- NVIDIA Riva TNT2 (NV5, 250 nm): http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/ee/NVIDIA_R_RIVA_TNT2_TM_64_W33152.00_0136B6_C_KOREA.jpg
- Trident TVGA8900CL-B (old ISA display controller): http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/cd/Trident_TVGA8900CL-B_BQ160089C_9311_A33496.1_c_Trident_92_089T_TSMC_TAIWAN_G3_04_TQ.jpg
- SEGA 315-6232 (Dreamcast sound processor with ARM7 core): http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/fe/SEGA_315-6232_G21003_9928_ABRG_JAPAN_F5.jpg
- Nintendo DMG-CPU B (Gameboy CPU): http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/58/DMG-CPU_B_1989_Nintendo_JAPAN_9203_D.jpg
- Motorola MC68705P3S (8-bit EPROM-microcontroller): http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/46/MOTOROLA_MC68705P3S_02A47E_IHEB9126_EZEBI_KOREA.jpg
- Winbond W78E65 (8-bit microcontroller): http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/ba/Winbond_W78E65P-40_430GF242101502SA.jpg
- Lucent/3Com Parallel Tasking II (LAN controller): http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/92/Parallel_Tasking_II_PERFORMANCE_3Com_40-0483-004_9913S_21220437_LUCENT_40-04834.jpg
- Texas Instruments TMS2764 (64 kbit EPROM): http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/db/Texas_Instruments_TMS_2764-25JL_WHP8640_JW2764HS_064557_SINGAPORE_40.jpg
Thank You a lot!

There are also some other great die shots from many contributors that I haven't linked to earlier:
- Support chip intended for first Apple Macintosh and designed by Apple and VTI (likely The Integrated Burrell Machine): http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Apple_VTI_Bagpipe.jpg
- Data General microEclipse: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8f/Eclipse_microprocessor.png (taken by Jpowerstech, information at http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Eclipse_microprocessor.png)
- Signetics 2650: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d4/Signetics_2650_chip_magnified.jpg (taken by Agroen, information at http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Signetics_2650_chip_magnified.jpg)
- National Semiconductor SC/MP: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8e/National_Semiconductor_SCMP-die.jpg (taken by Wosch21149, information at http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:National_Semiconductor_SCMP-die.jpg)
- Motorola MC68LC040: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/ac/Motorola68040die.jpg (taken by Gregg M. Erickson, information at http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Motorola68040die.jpg)
Thank You a lot for these!





I have also taken many die shots after I found out that I can use a good microscope at the university where I study. You can see the die shots taken by me at http://www.cpu-world.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=21226. I have uploaded my die shots to Wikimedia Commons (http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Special:Contributions/Birdman86) with CC-BY-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0) license so that everyone can use them. Here is a list of the best versions:

x86 CPUs and FPUs:
- AMD Athlon XP (Barton, 130 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/40/AMD_Athlon_XP_Barton_die.JPG
- AMD Athlon XP (Thoroughbred, 130 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b5/AMD_Athlon_XP_Thoroughbred_die.JPG
- AMD K5 (PR150 with 5k86 core, 350 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/17/AMD_K5_die2.JPG
- AMD K5 (PR75 with SSA/5 rev E core, 500 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/98/AMD_K5_PR75_die.JPG
- AMD Am5x86 (P75 version, 350 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/28/AMD_Am5x86_die.JPG
- AMD Am486 DX4 (Enhanced 120 MHz version with 8 KiB write-back cache, 500 nm): http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5a/AMD_80486DX4_die.JPG
- AMD Am486 DX4 (100 MHz version with 8 KiB write-through cache, 500 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6e/AMD_80486DX4-100_die.JPG
- AMD Am486 DX2 (80 MHz version with 8 KiB write-through cache, 500 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/86/AMD_80486DX2-80_die.JPG
- AMD Am486 DX2 (66 MHz version with 8 KiB write-through cache, 700 nm): http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9a/AMD_80486DX2_die.jpg
- AMD Am386 DX/DXL-40 (800 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/49/AMD_80386DX_die.JPG
- AMD Am286: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/21/AMD_Am286_die.JPG
- AMD 8088: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/89/AMD_8088_die.JPG
- Cyrix 6x86MX (M2, 350 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/13/Cyrix_6x86MX_die.JPG
- Cyrix 6x86 (M1, 600 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/29/Cyrix_6x86_die.JPG
- Cyrix MediaGXm (350 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1d/Cyrix_MediaGXm_die.JPG
- Cyrix 5x86-100GP (M1sc, 650 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/ab/Cyrix_5x86_die.jpg
- Cyrix Cx486DX2-80GP (likely 600 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5f/Cyrix_Cx486DX2-80_die.JPG
- Cyrix Cx486DX2-V66GP (likely 650 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/7e/Cyrix_Cx486DX2-V66_die.JPG
- ST ST486 DX2-66 (800 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/13/ST_ST486DX2_die.JPG
- Cyrix Cx486DX-40GP (800 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e8/Cyrix_Cx486DX-40_die.JPG
- Cyrix Cx486DLC-33GP (1000 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/cc/Cyrix_Cx486DLC_die.JPG
- Cyrix FasMath CX-83D87-33-GP: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/92/Cyrix_FasMath_die.JPG
- IDT WinChip (C6, 350 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/0e/IDT_WinChip_C6_die.JPG
- IIT 3C87-33 FPU: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/01/IIT_3C87_die.JPG
- IIT 2C87-16 FPU: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6d/IIT_2C87_die.JPG
- Intel Pentium MMX (P55C, 350 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/97/Intel_Pentium_MMX_die.JPG
- Intel Pentium OverDrive (P24T, 600 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/06/Intel_Pentium_OverDrive_die.JPG
- Intel Pentium (P54CS, 350 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6e/Intel_Pentium_120_MHz_P54CS_die.JPG
- Intel Pentium (P54C, 600 nm): http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5a/Intel_Pentium_P54C_die.jpg
- Intel 80486 DX4-100 (&EW with 16 KB write-back cache, 600 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1c/Intel_80486DX4_%26EW_die2.JPG and https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/91/Intel_80486DX4_%26EW_die.JPG
- Intel 80486 DX4-100 (&E with 16 KB write-through cache, 600 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b6/Intel_80486DX4_%26E_die.JPG
- Intel 80486 DX2-66 (SL enhanced P24S, 800 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/bd/Intel_80486_DX2_P24S_die.JPG
- Intel 80486 DX2-66 (P24, 800 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/45/Intel_80486_DX2_die.JPG
- Intel 80486 SX2-50 (800 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/ab/Intel_80486SX2_die.JPG
- Intel 80486 SX (SL enhanced P23, 1000 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e3/Intel_80486SX_die.JPG
- Intel 80386 DX-33 IV (1000 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/44/Intel_80386_IV_die.JPG
- Intel 80386 DX-25 (1500 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/22/Intel_80386_DX_die.JPG
- Intel 80387 FPU (DX 16-33 version, 1000 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/10/Intel_80387_die.JPG
- Intel 80387 FPU (DX-20 version, 1500 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d8/Intel_80387_early_die.JPG
- Intel 80286 (8 MHz version, 1500 nm): http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4b/Intel_80286_die.JPG
- Intel 80287 FPU (8 MHz version): http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/3b/Intel_80287_die.jpg
- Intel 80287 FPU (5 MHz version): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d1/Intel_80287_early_die.JPG
- Intel 80C186: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/81/Intel_80C186_die.JPG
- Intel 80186: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/ca/Intel_80186_die.JPG
- Intel 8087 FPU: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Intel_8087_die.JPG
- NEC V30 D70116D: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/06/NEC_V30_die.JPG
- ULSI Math Co DX (40 MHz 1003 version): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/09/ULSI_Math_Co_DX_die.JPG
- UMC GREEN CPU U5S-SUPER33: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e7/UMC_U5S_die.JPG

Other CPUs and FPUs:
- AMD Am29040: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/28/AMD_Am29040_die2.JPG and https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/cc/AMD_Am29040_die.JPG
- AMD Am29000 (1000 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d1/AMD_Am29000_die.JPG
- AMD Am9511A: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a6/AMD_Am9511A_die.JPG
- DEC Alpha 21164 (EV5, 500 nm): http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/ac/Alpha_EV5_die.JPG
- DEC MicroVAX 78032 CPU (DC333R, 3000 nm): http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/bf/DEC_MicroVAX_CPU_die.JPG
- DEC MicroVAX 78132 FPU (DC337C, 3000 nm): http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5f/DEC_MicroVAX_FPU_die.JPG
- DEC J-11 Data chip (DC334, 4000 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/0d/DEC_J-11_Data_chip_die.JPG
- DEC J-11 Control chip (DC335, 4000 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/bb/DEC_J-11_Control_chip_die.JPG
- DEC T-11 (DC310, 5000 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e3/DEC_T-11_die.JPG
- HP PA-7300LC (PCX-L2, 500 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e2/HP_PA-7300LC_die.JPG
- HP PA-7200 (PCX-T', 550 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2d/HP_PA-7200_die.JPG
- HP PA-7150 (PCX-T, 800 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1e/HP_PA-7150_die.JPG
- HP PA-7100LC (PCX-L, 750 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/3d/HP_PA-7100LC_die.JPG
- HP PA-7000 (PCX-S, 1000 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/85/HP_PA-7000_die.JPG
- HP Nanoprocessor 1820-1692: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6a/HP_Nanoprocessor_die.JPG
- Inmos T805 transputer: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/08/Inmos_T805_die.JPG
- Inmos T225 transputer: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/97/Inmos_T225_die.JPG
- Intel 80960HD (600 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d5/Intel_80960HD_die.JPG
- Intel 80960CA: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/45/Intel_80960CA_die.JPG
- Intel 80960KA: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/ef/Intel_80960KA_die.JPG
- Intersil 6100: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/cc/Intersil_6100_die.JPG and https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/fe/Intersil_6100_die2.JPG
- MMI 6701D 4-bit bit-slice processor: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5c/MMI_6701D_die.JPG
- nCUBE nCUBE-2 (1000 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/52/NCUBE_nCUBE-2_die.JPG
- NEC VR5000 (150 MHz version, 350 nm): http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/7b/NEC_VR5000_die.JPG
- IDT R4600 (Orion, 650 nm): http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a8/IDT_R4600_die.jpg
- NEC VR4400MC (200 MHz version, 350 nm): http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/23/NEC_VR4400_die.JPG
- MIPS R4000 (800 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4a/MIPS_R4000_die.JPG
- Performance Semiconductor PIPER with PR3000A MIPS CPU and PR3010A FPA (600 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b0/Performance_PIPER_die.JPG
- MIPS R3000A (1200 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/60/MIPS_R3000A_die.JPG
- Motorola 68040: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/ae/Motorola_68040_die.JPG
- Motorola 68LC040 (shrinked die): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1b/Motorola_68LC040_die.JPG
- Motorola 68030: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d2/Motorola_68030_die.JPG
- Motorola 68020 (shrinked die): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6d/Motorola_68020_die.JPG
- Motorola 68882 FPU: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/75/Motorola_68882_die.JPG
- Motorola 68881 FPU: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1b/Motorola_68881_die.JPG
- Motorola 68012 (3500 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/22/Motorola_MC68012_die.JPG
- Motorola 6809: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a9/Motorola_6809_die.JPG
- National Semiconductor 16032 CPU: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/95/NS_NS16032_die.JPG and https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/07/NS_NS16032_die2.JPG
- National Semiconductor 16081 FPU: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/7b/NS_NS16081_die.JPG and https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/ca/NS_NS16081_die2.JPG
- Signetics 8X305: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/43/Signetics_8X305_die.JPG
- Signetics 8X300: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/58/Signetics_8X300_die.JPG
- Sun SuperSPARC II (Voyager, 800 nm): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/56/Sun_SuperSPARC_II_die.JPG
- Weitek 8601 SPARC CPU: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/cb/Weitek_8601_die.JPG
- Texas Instruments ACT29116 (Am29116 at 1000 nm CMOS): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/71/TI_ACT29116_die.JPG
- Zilog Z8002: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c1/Zilog_Z8002_die.JPG
- MME 80A-CPU (Z80 clone): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/92/MME_80A-CPU_die.JPG

Digital signal processors:
- AT&T WE DSP32: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/82/AT%26T_WE_DSP32_die.JPG
- Motorola DSP56001: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/7b/Motorola_DSP56001_die.JPG
- Texas Instruments C2XLP544B DSP: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5a/TI_DSP_C2XLP544B_die.JPG
- Texas Instruments TMS320C209 DSP: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/09/TI_TMS320C209_DSP_die.JPG
- Texas Instruments TMS320C511 DSP: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/84/TI_TMS320C511_DSP_die.JPG
- Texas Instruments TMS320C51 DSP: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/63/TI_TMS320C51_DSP_die.JPG
- Texas Instruments TMS320C50 DSP: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/ab/TI_TMS320C50_DSP_die.JPG
- Texas Instruments TMS320C31 DSP: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/97/TI_TMS320C31_DSP_die.JPG
- Texas Instruments TMS320C25 DSP: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/22/TI_TMS320C25_DSP_die.JPG
- Texas Instruments TMS320C15 DSP: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6a/TI_TMS320C15_DSP_die.JPG
- Texas Instruments TMS320P14 DSP: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2a/TI_TMS320C14_DSP_die.JPG

Microcontrollers:
- Intel 83C196KB (MCS-96): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/ba/Intel_83C196KB_die.JPG
- Intel D87C51FC-1 (MCS-51): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a9/Intel_87C51FC_die.JPG
- AMD D8751H (MCS-51): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9e/AMD_8751H_die.JPG
- Intel D8751H (MCS-51): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/29/Intel_8751H_die.JPG
- NEC D8749HD (MCS-4Cool: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/0c/NEC_D8749HD_die.JPG
- Fujitsu MBL8742H (MCS-4Cool: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/50/Fujitsu_MBL8742H_die_shot.JPG
- Intel D8742 (MCS-4Cool: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/79/Intel_8742_die.JPG
- Microchip PIC16C74A: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d7/Microchip_PIC16C74A_die.JPG
- Motorola MC68701U4L-1: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/bc/Motorola_MC68701U4_die.JPG
- Motorola MC68701L-1: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/7b/Motorola_MC68701_die.JPG

Memory chips:
- Intel D27256J-2 (256 kbit EPROM): http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9d/Intel_D27256J-2_die.JPG and http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/89/Intel_D27256J-2_die2.JPG
- Texas Instruments TMS27C512 (512 kbit EPROM): http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/73/TI_TMS27C512_die.JPG
- ST M27C4002 (4 Mbit EPROM): http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5c/ST_M27C4002_die.JPG

Other chips:
- AMD Am7990 local area network controller for ethernet (LANCE): http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/31/AMD_Am7990_die.JPG
- AMD Am85C80 combined SCSI and dual channel serial communications controller: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a5/AMD_Am85C80_die.JPG
- Apple peripheral interface controller (PIC) with 2 MHz NCR 65CX02 microprocessor core: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/ec/Apple_PIC_die.JPG
- Bt Bt462KG150 RAMDAC: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/44/Bt_Bt462KG150_RAMDAC_die.JPG
- C-Cube CL4000 MPEG-1 encoder: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/47/C-Cube_CL4000_die.JPG
- DEC 78690 (DC323C) chip on the VS40X 4 plane color graphics board of VAXstation 2000: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/36/DEC_78690_die.JPG
- DEC 78680 (DC502A) chip on the VS40X 4 plane color graphics board of VAXstation 2000 (4 such chips on the board): http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c0/DEC_78680_die.JPG
- DEC 78650 (DC526B) chip on the VS40X 4 plane color graphics board of VAXstation 2000: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6b/DEC_78650_die.JPG
- DEC 78620 (DC510BB) chip on the VS40X 4 plane color graphics board of VAXstation 2000: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f0/DEC_78620_die.JPG
- Inmos G171 color look-up table: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2b/Inmos_IMSG171S_die.JPG
- Intel 82395DX smart cache chip for 80386DX: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4a/Intel_82395DX_die.JPG
- Intel 82385 cache controller for 80386: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/3a/Intel_82385_die.JPG
- Intel 82258 advanced direct memory access coprocessor: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e3/Intel_82258_die.JPG
- Lucent T 7102A RC: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/39/Lucent_T_7102A_RC_die.JPG

I hope you enjoy these! Thank You a lot to aberco, CPUShack, HARDWARECOP, kaijusears, iguana and others who have halpad my to get all these dies. I'm really looking forward to open more chips and take die shots of them now that I can easily take high-res die shots. Thus, if you want to help me improve my die shot collection and see more die shots with this kind of quality, then you can consider donating or selling some damaged or just unnecessary chips that I haven't got yet.


Last edited by Birdman. on Wed Feb 19, 2014 3:34 pm; edited 5 times in total
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RetroRTL



Joined: 09 Jul 2013
Posts: 6
Location: Sweden

PostPosted: Thu Jul 11, 2013 3:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Have you seen "The Chip Collection" at Smithsonian? Among other things there are some nice construction analysis reports there written by the integrated circuit engineering corporation (ICE). These reports typically include die photos. (Unfortunately the whole die photos are pretty low quality, but the magnifications are of a very high quality, although probably of more interest to process engineers.

http://smithsonianchips.si.edu/ice/s4.htm is probably the most interesting page there.

There are some neat historic pictures in http://smithsonianchips.si.edu/augarten/index.htm where a selection of important landmarks in IC technology are described together with a die photo for each chip. (Although there seems to be something fishy going on with the page, I need to open each page of the book in a new window or tab rather than left clicking for some odd reason.)

Photos of image sensors: http://smithsonianchips.si.edu/egg/egg.htm

There are some really really old chip photos in the ICE collection as well at http://smithsonianchips.si.edu/ice/s11-100000.htm.

Another photo I'd like to have a larger magnification of is the following photo of the innards of the first handheld calculator: http://www.ti.com/corp/docs/kilbyctr/downloadphotos.shtml (See the last photo on this page.) We have truly come a long way since then...
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Birdman.



Joined: 13 Nov 2012
Posts: 167
Location: Finland

PostPosted: Mon Aug 26, 2013 6:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, I've seen "The Chip Collection" at Smithsonian before, but I couldn't find so many useful die shots there. Only a colored by me version of the complete NKK NR4645LQF-133 die photo from the ICE construction analysis report is included in my collection so that I can compare it to the R4600 die shot I've taken.

Anyway, I've added many new die shots to the previous Wikimedia Commons post taken my me and Epop. I've also added links to new AMD Temash/Kabini and Intel Haswell die shots at the first page to keep this collection updated with the latest chips. I hope you enjoy looking at all those new die shots. At least the list of die shots at Wikimedia Commons is already getting pretty impressive, and I'll add many more there later this week Very Happy
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Birdman.



Joined: 13 Nov 2012
Posts: 167
Location: Finland

PostPosted: Wed Feb 19, 2014 6:17 pm    Post subject: Update and some more links Reply with quote

I've now updated previous posts with die shots of AMD Kaveri, Intel Ivy Bridge-E/EN/EP/EX, Avoton and Bay Trail, and IBM Power8. I've also fixed some broken links and updated the list of all die shots taken by me with hopefully more useful structure.

Here are also some links to more die shots:
- AT&T BellMac-32 (originally BellMac-80, 3.5 m): http://nisl.soe.ucsc.edu/images/pictures/BellMac-80.jpg
- AT&T BellMac-32A (2.5 m): http://nisl.soe.ucsc.edu/images/pictures/BellMac-32A.jpg (both at http://nisl.soe.ucsc.edu/others.html)
- NEC V60: http://www.sxc.hu/photo/403156
- Texas Instruments TMS1000: http://www.cpu-zone.com/Texas/logic-1000_1.jpg (at http://www.cpu-zone.com/Texas%201000.htm) and http://www.visual6502.org/images/pages/Texas_Instruments_TMS1000_die_shots.html
- Texas Instruments TMS1100: http://www.seanriddle.com/tms1100.html (Check also other die shots taken by Sean Riddle at http://www.seanriddle.com/decap.html including Fairchild 3851 and ST 6809E, Thank You a lot!)

Then Chipworks has taken and released several nice Apple SoC die shots:
- Apple A5 (used in iPhone 4s and iPad 2, 45 nm): http://www.chipworks.com/media/wpmu/uploads/blogs.dir/4/files/2011/10/APL0498_APL0498E01_Backside.jpg
- Apple A5X (used in iPad 3, 45 nm): http://www.chipworks.com/media/wpmu/uploads/blogs.dir/4/files/2012/03/AppleA5X-big.jpg
- Apple A6 (used in iPhone 5, 32 nm): http://www.chipworks.com/en/technical-competitive-analysis/resources/blog/recentteardowns/files/2012/09/APL0598_Poly.jpg
- Apple A6X (used in iPad 4, 32 nm): http://www.chipworks.com/components/com_wordpress/wp/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/applea6xpoly-annot21.jpg (I really hope that I could somehow get unannotated version of this for my collection.)
- Apple A7 (used in iPhone 5s, iPad 5 and iPad Mini 2, 28 nm): http://images.anandtech.com/galleries/3089/APL0698_148138_PolyB-s.png

I hope that these have some interesting ones for you! Anyway, I'm still taking new die shots and try to release more as soon as possible.
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